Pondering the Switch from iOS

A couple emails came in this week asking why I think Android is so much better than iOS, and particularly iPhone. The gist was that I’m an “Android fanboy” as bad as some “iPhone fanboys.” While that may be true, I don’t think I’ve ever said Android is far superior to iOS, I just like the Android system better. In fact, what I usually tell people is that you need to know more about both systems in order to effectively choose the right one. Jumping on the Android or iOS bandwagon won’t do you any good if your system can’t do what you need it to.

For instance, if you’re a techno-phile litigator, you’re probably going to want to seriously consider an iPad as a trial presentation platform. Quite simply, if you’re going to use it, TrialPad is a sweet program.

However, if you’re like me, you probably want to be able to do three main things: review and draft documents, emails, etc.; read magazines or books; and conveniently store materials and information for limited or moderate use in court. I don’t need, and probably wouldn’t use, a fancy trial presentation program or jury-pool organizer.

So, when it comes to deciding between the different operating systems, you need to seriously evaluate each of them. If you’re going to make the switch, this post might come in handy. If you want some Android fanboy rhetoric about why my system rock, check out this post. Otherwise, you can see my advice on making the move to Android here or here.

2 Responses to Pondering the Switch from iOS

  1. Speaking of using your device in court… have u ever accidentally presented something u didnt want an audience to see?

  2. I haven’t seen any significant problems, though I haven’t used my tablet extensively for too many presentations which weren’t scripted or via presentation software. Tablets function similarly to laptops or desktops, so what you see is what you get.

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Jeff Taylor

I’m just an ordinary guy living an extraordinary life. I’m also an attorney and I blog about Android for lawyers. You can follow me on Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, or Google+.